Home Home Home About Us Home About Us About Us About Us /links/index.html /links/index.html /links/index.html /advertising/index.html /links/index.html /advertising/index.html /advertising/index.html /advertising/index.html About Us About Us /archives/index.html About Us /archives/index.html About Us /archives/index.html /archives/index.html /subscribe/index.html /archives/index.html /subscribe/index.html /archives/index.html /subscribe/index.html /subscribe/index.html /survey/index.html /subscribe/index.html /survey/index.html /subscribe/index.html /survey/index.html /survey/index.html /survey/index.html /links/index.html /survey/index.html /links/index.html /links/index.html /links/index.html
Home About Us About Us /links/index.html /advertising/index.html /advertising/index.html
About Us /archives/index.html /archives/index.html /subscribe/index.html /subscribe/index.html /survey/index.html /survey/index.html /survey/index.html /links/index.html

FAMOUS INTERVIEWS

Directories:

SCHOLARSHIPS & GRANTS

HELP WANTED

Tutors

Workshops

Events

Sections:

Books

Camps & Sports

Careers

Children’s Corner

Collected Features

Colleges

Cover Stories

Distance Learning

Editorials

Famous Interviews

Homeschooling

Medical Update

Metro Beat

Movies & Theater

Museums

Music, Art & Dance

Special Education

Spotlight On Schools

Teachers of the Month

Technology

Archives:

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

2001

1995-2000


 
New York City
November 2003

NTIís Dragon Burn CD/DVD Utility
by Mitchell Levine

Simply having hardware doesnít necessarily benefit the user. Although this might seem like an obvious truth, it unfortunately doesnít always hit home until itís too late. The investment in technology made by our schools over the last several years, while being the first efforts towards a laudable goal, will do nothing by itself. Educational benefits are only available if all that hardware can be made to do something worthwhile.

For example, having an entire class outfitted with state-of-the-art (by education standards) laptops is quite unlikely to do much more than equalize access to very expensive typewriters, if the entire class canít be coordinated. Interactive technology in the classroom wonít really lead to interaction unless a teacher and her class are on the same page: Sharing assignments, demonstrating skills, and simplifying the day by eliminating drudgery like scoring tests by hand.

While it would be nice if every school were able to provide an 802.11a-grade wireless LAN that stretched from one end of the district to another, itís probably not going to happen anytime soon. Until that day comes, parents, teachers and students will have to share files the old-fashioned way Ė through storage media. Floppies, however, are rather limited, especially given todayís extensive multimedia files, and ZIP disks much too expensive. The most practical ones, CDs and DVDs, while capacious and well-supported by educationís favorite hardware manufacturer, Appleís standard options, have traditionally been plagued by poorly executed software applications, an alphabet soup of file types, and generally bad documentation.

NTIís Dragon Burn provides what seems to be the first truly workable solution for the institutional use of CD/DVD burners available for the MAC OS environment. Just listing all the various file types and standards the program can handle would probably take more room than this section can handle, a godsend for design and digital editing classes that must negotiate the potpourri of them those specialties inevitably require.

Other features will be comfortable as well, including support for multiple burning Ė which teachers that accept work or give and grade tests by digital means will undoubtedly appreciate. One clever feature Iíve actually not seen in another application: Support for multiple document interfaces. With this in place, itís actually possible to create and edit layouts while burning, an excellent time management proposition for the busy AV department.

The product is really too feature-rich to give a complete listing of its potential. I highly recommend that any classroom instructor leading a design or editing specialty program, teacher implementing an enterprise program communicated through CD/DVD, or, most especially, an IT manager/consultant at any large school get the full product details from the company themselves, which can be done at their site, www.ntius.com.#

Name:-
E-mail:
City: State:
Comments:

Education Update, Inc., P.O. Box 1588, New York, NY 10159.
Tel: (212) 477-5600. Fax: (212) 477-5893. Email: ednews1@aol.com.
All material is copyrighted and may not be printed without express consent of the publisher. © 2003.


 

TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION
DIRECTORIES