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ARCHIVES : MEDICAL UPDATE : 2004

December 2004

Dr. Norman G. Levinsky:
A Great Teacher Remembered Forever

By Pola Rosen, Ed.D.
Recently a memorial service was held at Boston University for Dr. Norman Levinsky, a great medical school professor, teacher, clinician, and researcher. READ ARTICLE

BEYOND THE STETHOSCOPE
Clear Screen
By Donald A. Feinfeld, M.D.
READ ARTICLE

November 2004

Medical Memories of the Marathon
By Dr. Hugh J. Carroll READ ARTICLE

July 2004

Autistic Spectrum Disorder: Part II
by Cecelia M. McCarton, M.D.
READ MORE

Institute to Bring Economic Benefits to New Jersey, Medical Miracles to World
READ MORE

Unique National Collaboration Enhances Patient Care, Research & Medical Ed.
READ MORE

50-State Study on Women’s Health Finds Small Gains, Key Setbacks
READ MORE

June 2004

Penn Research Finds Error in Children's Growth
READ MORE

Silver Hill Hospital Launches New Transitional Programs
by Nancy S. Helle
READ MORE

Weill Cornell Begins New Stem Cell Center
READ MORE

May 2004

The Ultimate Gift of Life
by Khalid M.H. Butt, M.D., FRCS, FACS READ MORE

Kidney Donor Speaks Out
by Sybil Maimin READ MORE

Independent Voter Support
for Ending Bush Limits on Stem Cell Lines is Strong

READ MORE

Dr. Lishan Aklog
Is Named As One of New York's Top Black Doctors

READ MORE

Children's Defense Fund & Aetna
Eliminate Disparities

April 2004

April: Alcohol Awareness Month
by Richard J. Frances, M.D. & Avram H. Mack, M.D.
Thanks to the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, April is Alcohol Awareness Month with a special focus on the prevention of underage drinking. READ MORE

A Better Way to Treat Children With Cancer READ MORE

Match Day at NYU Med READ MORE

Jay Monahan Center for Gastrointestinal Health Opens
by Herman Rosen, M.D.
The Jay Monahan Center for Gastrointestinal Health opened at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center. Named in honor of the late husband of NBC co-anchor Katie Couric, who...
READ MORE

March 2004

Ethical Challenges in Pediatrics
by Joanna R. Leefer
Developments in genetics, reproductive technologies and other disciplines have brought new challenges in every area of medicine. This is particularly true in pediatrics. New advances in all areas of treatments have created complex ethical questions for the provision of care and for research with children. . . READ MORE

Weill Cornell Faculty Elected to Institute of Medicine
Two outstanding physician-scientists at Weill Cornell Medical College have been elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, one of the highest honors bestowed by the scientific community. They are Dr. Flint Beal, Chairman and Anne Parish Titzell Professor of Neurology and Neuroscience and Dr. Jean Pape, Professor of Medicine in the Division of International Medicine and Infectious Diseases at Weill Cornell Medical College. Dr. Pape serves as Director of the Cornell University Infectious Diseases Research and Training Unit in Haiti. . . READ MORE

The National Museum of Health and Medicine
by Janet M. Burns
Museums play a vital role in public education, awareness, and understanding. The National Museum of Health and Medicine (NMHM) has a particularly long history of serving the public in this capacity in its 142-year tenure as the nation’s only medical museum. In fact, the NMHM’s specimens and artifacts were the first museum collection in the country and are currently the only in Washington, D.C. to be registered by the U.S. Department of the Interior as a National Historic Landmark. Since it’s founding, the museum has remained dedicated to documenting the evolution of health and medical issues in American society, and to sharing its collections with as many people as possible. . . READ MORE

Latest Preventive Tests for Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment at Beth Israel
by Gina Pozadas
Continuing their commitment to early detection of cardiovascular disease, the Center for Preventive Cardiology at the Heart Institute at Beth Israel offers cutting-edge screenings that identify new risk factors as key to assess the risk of developing heart disease, which remains the nation’s number one killer. The EBT heart scan and advanced cholesterol testing, used to test those with an intermediate risk level, can predict and prevent up to 95% of heart attacks and are often covered by health insurance. . . READ MORE

Attorney General Demands More Private Medical Records of Women
In an ominous attack on women’s reproductive health and their right to privacy, the Justice Department first demanded that at least six hospitals across the country turn over patient medical records on certain abortions performed there. Now U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft is demanding that Planned Parenthood affiliates in Pennsylvania, Kansas, mid-Missouri, New York City, Los Angeles, San Diego and the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area turn in hundreds of private medical records from the clients they serve. . . READ MORE

Women Physicians Honored in New Web Site
A new Web site from the National Library of Medicine (NLM) promises to become an invaluable resource for students, educators and anyone else with an interest in medical history. . . READ MORE

January 2004

Columbia and Vanderbilt University Nurses Plan Emergency Response
by Jocelyn K. Egyes
With the increasing rise of terrorism threats and everyday man-made emergencies world wide, nurses are at the forefront of helping to save lives. Usually first on the scene or first to respond to a patient, they need to think fast and perform quickly. And thanks to Columbia University's and...
READ MORE

Center for Research & Treatment of Childhood Diabetes Expands
The world's premier center for the research and treatment of childhood diabetes is about to get a new $32 million home, tripling its original size and making it the largest pediatric diabetes facility in the country, if not the world.
READ MORE

New Center for Osteoporosis Treatment,
Research & Education

Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center at New York-Presbyterian Hospital announced the completion of the Toni Stabile Osteoporosis Center, a new standard for treatment, research, and education relating to the disease. The Center, the largest in the New York City metropolitan area and one...
READ MORE

Two Weill Cornell Faculty Elected to the
Institute of Medicine

Two outstanding physician-scientists at Weill Cornell Medical College have been elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, one of the highest honors bestowed by the scientific community. They are Dr. Flint Beal, Chairman and Anne Parish Titzell...
READ MORE

December 2003

AAAS Urges United Nations to Endorse Cloning for Research Purposes
AAAS, the world's largest general science society, urged the United Nations to support embryonic cloning for research or "therapeutic" purposes, but ban all efforts to use cloning for human reproduction.
READ MORE

Children's Hospital that Wall Street Built
Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital of NewYork-Presbyterian, the only children's hospital in Manhattan and one of the largest in the country, opened its doors recently.
READ MORE

NYU School of Medicine Faculty Member
Receives France's Highest Scientific Honor
The French Academy of Sciences selected Dr. David Sabatini as the recipient of its highest honor for 2003, the Grande Medaille D'Or (the Grand Gold Medal), in recognition of his scientific contributions to Cell Biology.
READ MORE

November 2003

Bristol-Myers Squibb Awards $5.6 Million in Unrestricted Grants
Bristol-Myers Squibb (NYSE: BMY) recently hosted the ?gFreedom to Discover?h awards ceremony, an event-recognizing scientists who have made significant contributions to biomedical researc
re READ MORE

Hospital Launches Joint Emergency Medicine Residency Program
New York-Presbyterian Hospital has inaugurated an innovative Emergency Medicine Residency Program, one of the first emergency medicine residency programs between two academic...
READ MORE

Innovative Holistic Nursing Program at Bellevue Hospital Center
Through an unprecedented state grant award, New York College of Health Professions will offer its innovative Holistic Nursing program at Bellevue Hospital Center, the first in-hospital...
READ MORE

Gov. Opens Cancer Center in South Jersey
Continuing his personal commitment to make New Jersey a national leader in cancer care and research, Governor James E. McGreevey formally opened the state?fs first and only multidisciplinary...

READ MORE

Women's Health Symposium at Weill Cornell
Medical College

by Jocelyn K. Egyes
Heart disease is the number one killer of men and women, said Dr. Lisa Callahan to an auditorium full of women at the 21st Annual Women's Health Symposium in New York. ?gIf you are not worried...

READ MORE

October 2003

National Depression Screening Day is October 9th
Your youngest son comes into your room at 6:00 a.m. to let you know that his big sister is having cookies and soda for breakfast. Meanwhile, your seven-year-old has been up all night with a stomach bug. And thus your day begins.
READ MORE

October is Lupus Awareness Month: Mystery Illness Strikes Young Women
No doubt learning that one's unexplained symptoms, including extreme fatigue, joint pain, sun-sensitivity or a rash, are caused by the disease lupus is a frightening experience for a young woman. But, for many, awareness is the first step toward healthier living.
READ MORE

New Study Distinguishes Anthrax from Flu in Event of Bioterrorist Attack edited
by Herman Rosen, M.D.
Doctors in the Department of Public Health at Weill Cornell Medical Center have identified key symptoms that may help distinguish flu and other common respiratory conditions from more serious inhaled anthrax in the event of a bioterrorist attack.
READ MORE

Estee Lauder & Poly Prep Students Make a Difference
Starting October 1, motorists traveling across the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge may wonder why Poly Prep?fs clock tower has turned pink. Brooklyn?fs 85-year-old landmark will be in good company: Niagara Falls, The Empire State Building, The National Assembly in Paris, the Royal Opera House at Covent Garden in London, and Poly?fs tower will be among the many buildings illuminated in pink light during the month of October?\as part of the Global Landmarks Illumination Initia-tive that heralds Breast Cancer Awareness Month.
READ MORE

Acute Nursing Shortage in US
The American Health Care Association (AHCA) and the National Center for Assisted Living (NCAL) praised Senators Barbara Mikulski (D-MD) and Susan Collins (R-ME) for their continued leadership in passing an amendment in the U.S. Senate to increase funding for the Nurse Reinvestment Act and other key Title VIII nursing workforce development programs by $50 million, thereby bringing total funding for these efforts to almost $163 million.
READ MORE

Innovative Spinal Surgery in Live Webcast
A new minimally invasive approach to spinal surgery will be broadcast live on the Internet at 5 pm EDT on Tuesday, October 7 from Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center.
READ MORE

September 2003

Live Heart Surgery on the Internet
Surgeons at Brigham and Women?fs Hospital (BWH) in Boston recently replaced a patient?fs aortic valve during a live Internet broadcast. The web cast, which is the third in a series, is intended to educate medical students, cardiac surgeons, and the general public about the latest minimally invasive techniques now available for such a procedure.
READ MORE

A Smoking Gun:
Speaking to 9.8 Million Women & Girls of NYS

by Antonia C. Novello, M.D., M.P.H., Dr.P.h.
I am writing to you about a product that each year kills more New Yorkers than alcohol, cocaine, crack, heroin, murder, suicide, car accidents, fire and AIDS combined. I am speaking of tobacco.

READ MORE

Back to School Vaccines
As our nation prepares for Back to School time, there is one school supply parents and children cannot go without: vaccinations. Taking your child to a doctor's office isn't the easiest thing to do, but it could save his or her life. In many states, the law requires a certain number of doses of mandated vaccines before the first day of classes.

READ MORE

August 2003

What Color is Your Summer?
A visit to The New York Botanical Garden Saturday, August 9, 2003, Chinese Garden: The Cheung family takes you on a special guided tour of their garden. See bitter melon, tomatoes, and Chinese celery.

READ MORE

New Study Supports Adding Nutrients to
Infant Formulas

The results of a new study show that Enfamil LIPIL with Iron which is supplemented with the fatty acids DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) and ARA (arachidonic acid) helps to significantly improve the visual development of infants compared to non-supplemented formula.
READ MORE

Vital Role of Nursing Assistants Acknowledged
The American Health Care Association (AHCA) and the National Center for Assisted Living (NCAL) urge all Americans to salute the dedicated work of nursing assistants throughout our nation who, under the most challenging of circumstances, provide compassionate, selfless service to our nation's most vulnerable seniors and persons with disabilities.
READ MORE

College Provost will Lead State Medical
School Association

Ralph A. O'Connell, M.D., New York Medical College provost and dean of its School of Medicine, has been elected president of the Associated Medical Schools of New York.
READ MORE

Four CCNY Grads Receive Salk Scholarships for Medical School
A Brooklyn resident whose goal is to find a cure for lupus, a Pakistani immigrant involved in a complex cancer research project, and a soon to be wed graduate with an interest in DNA are City College?fs 2003 Jonas E. Salk Scholarship recipients.
READ MORE

July 2003

Protect your Eyes During Long, Summer Days
There's so much to see and do in the summer. At the same time, there are many things about summer that could get in the way of seeing anything all year around.
READ MORE

Reflections of New Physicians
Close to one in four newly trained physicians would select a field other than medicine if they could begin their careers again, according to a survey by Merritt, Hawkins, & Associates, a Dallas-based physician search and consulting firm.
READ MORE

Silver Hill Hospital Names New President
& Medical Director

Sigurd H. Ackerman, M.D. has been named President and Medical Director of Silver Hill Hospital in New Canaan, CT. In announcing the appointment, Steve Stillerman, Board Chairman of the nationally recognized psychiatric hospital, noted Dr. Ackerman?fs distinguished career in the practice of psychiatry.
READ MORE

June 2003

Dental Professor wins County College?fs Top
Teaching Award

A dental professor recognized as a role model in teaching, departmental leadership and dentistry has won the top instructional award available to Camden County College faculty.
READ MORE

Dog Bite Prevention
Children make up 60 percent of the 4.7 million bitten by dogs each year. Dog bite attacks occur year round and can be harmful and sometimes deadly.
READ MORE

Ludwig W. Eichna, M.D., 94, Medical Educator
and Innovator

by Herman Rosen, M.D.
Dr. Ludwig W. Eichna, former Professor and Chairman of the Department of Medicine at SUNY Downstate Medical Center in Brooklyn, was memorialized at a recent ceremony at Downstate Medical Center.
READ MORE

Mount Sinai School of Medicine: Fastest Growing Research Program in NYS
Mount Sinai School of Medicine is ranked 22nd among the nation?fs 125 medical schools in receipt of funds from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). NIH awards to Mount Sinai School of Medicine in Government FY02 totaled $142.2 million.
READ MORE

Mothers Giving Birth Donate Record Number of
Life-Saving Umbilical Cord Bloods

Mothers giving birth at New York-Presbyterian Hospital Weill Cornell Medical Center and The Brooklyn Hospital Center, both members of the New York-Presbyterian Healthcare System, voluntarily donated a record number of life-saving umbilical cord bloods to New York Blood Center's National Cord Blood Program last year, representing 41 percent of the Program?fs one-year cord blood donations.
READ MORE

May 2003

The Barnard Summit: Women and Health
by Kim Brown
Barnard College hosted a daylong forum on women's health trends worldwide, The Barnard Summit: Women and Health.
READ MORE

NY Presbyterian Hospital Launches Science Education for Teens
New York Presbyterian Hospital has joined forces with philanthropist Eugene M. Lang to create a pilot program designed to both foster academic success for low-income neighborhood youth and to facilitate their entry into health careers.
READ MORE

April 2003

A Discussion of the Hippocratic Oath
by Herman Rosen, M.D.
?gThe Hippocratic Oath and Its Role In Modern Medicine?h was the topic of a recent conference under the auspices of the Onassis Public Benefit Foundation in collaboration with the Hellenic Medical Society of N.Y. . . READ MORE

Can Cancer be Prevented?
by Cynthia Stein, M.D., M.P.H.
Special to Education Update
Can cancer be prevented? Yes. In fact, at the Harvard Center for Cancer Prevention, we estimate that more than half of all cancers in the US could be prevented. . . .
READ MORE

Addiction Psychiatry & Pain Management Focus of Silver Hill Seminar
The latest developments in Addiction Psychiatry, the use of painkillers and the management of chronic pain, are the focus of the Spring Seminar at Silver Hill Hospital in New Canaan, Conn. . . .
READ MORE

March 2003

Panel Investigates Deaths of 3 Students
by Tom Kertes
During the first week of January, three public school students, 19 year-old Kimario Green, 16 year-old Katherine Bodden and 13 year-old Randy Charlotte, died of cardiac-related problems on school grounds within seven days. The tragic irony? Each child?fs life might have been saved by a defibrillator, and the New York State Legislature passed a law requiring that all 1200 New York City Public schools be equipped with defibrillators (AEDs) by December 1, 2002. Why the noncompliance? The City Council, in a joint oversight public hearing by the Committees of Education and Health, looked into the unacceptable situation.
READ MORE

Governor McGreevey Backs Stem Cell Legislation
Continuing his commitment to make New Jersey a national leader in cancer care and research, Governor James E. McGreevey pledged to support legislation which would authorize stem cell research in the state.
READ MORE

Pace University Creates Institute for Healthy Aging
The Lienhard School of Nursing of Pace University has recently established the Institute for Healthy Aging (IHA) on its New York and Pleasantville campuses. The Institute will provide education and research geared toward individuals 40 years of age and older and to health care professionals servicing this population. Initial funding for the IHA was provided by grants from the Mary and Milton B. Rosenbach Foundation.
READ MORE

February 2003

Two Teen Deaths in NYC
by Andrew Schiff
Despite a state law signed by Governor Pataki that required local school districts to have defibrillators on hand at all times, two deaths recently...
READ MORE

A Clarion Call for Action for School Health Centers
by April Lee, M.D.
School health centers offer unique alternatives to the traditional medical office setting in providing health care for children and youth. If the health center is school-based, it is located...
READ MORE

Rockefeller University Names Sir Paul Nurse, President
Paul Nurse, a British Nobel laureate and head of Cancer Research, UK, is taking over as Rockefeller's 9th president. Dr. Nurse shared the Nobel prize in 2001 for his work...
READ MORE

Was Kennedy Too Sick to be President?
Humanities and science mesh in program at Weill Cornell Medical College.

by Alexandra Shimo-Barry
In a lecture at Weill Cornell Medical College, Boston University historian Robert Dallek discussed Kennedy's secret life of sickness and medication. Dallek was granted exclusive access...
READ MORE

January 2003

Beyond the Stethescope - Donald Feinfeld, M.D.
READ MORE

Lasers: State-of-the-Art in Dermatolog
by Sybil Maimin
Ever wonder what happens to Westinghouse (now Intel) Science Talent Search winners? Well, one, Dr. Arielle N.B. Kauvar, board certified dermatologist and a fellow of...
READ MORE

Optimal Therapy for High Blood Pressure
by Herman Rosen, M.D.
Results of the largest study ever to determine the optimal treatment of hypertension were published December 18, 2002 in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The...
READ MORE

Weill Cornell Medical Advances:
First Robotic Urologic Surgery Done on Child in NYC

Edited by Herman Rosen, M.D.
Dr. Dix Poppas, Chief of Pediatric Urology at New York-Presbyterian Hospital Weill Cornell Medical Center performed the first robotic urologic surgery on a child in...
READ MORE

December 2002

Treating Adolescent Addiction: An Ongoing Challenge
by Drs. Richard Frances & Avram Mack
The use, abuse and treatment of substance abuse in children and adolescents has been a major focus of attention for parents, school personnel, law enforcement officers and mental health professions. The prevalence of Substance Use Disorder...
READ MORE

Drug Use Condoned on College Campus
by Hope Glassberg
I got here with a little drug experience, I'll leave with a lot more. I'd never hallucinated before I got here; I?fd rarely done a line of anything, definitely never dropped any E. I have now,said Mark*, a student at a private college in New York City.
READ MORE

Pro-Drug Websites Pose a Danger for Students
by Sandra S. Bennett
Last year physicians at Boston's Children's Hospital used the Internet to search for information about street drugs. They found that the most popular sites are those that condone and promote drug use. Gravely concerned, the physicians published an...
READ MORE

Ecstasy Is Agony
by Kevin A. Sabet
It was a crowded Saturday night at a local rave. Having passed out over 4,000, This Is Your Brain on Ecstasy, post-cards to ravers waiting to get into the club, I moved over to one side of the line and saw what appeared to be a 22-year old man...
READ MORE

Beyond the Stethescope:
THE SYCOPHANT (Pachyderma adulans)

by Dr. Donald Feinfeld
READ MORE

November 2002

Keys to Beating Breast Cancer: Awareness & Education
by Marie Holmes
On the eve of New York City?fs annual Race for the Cure in Central Park, a fundraiser so successful that it has practically become a national event, women gathered at the Hotel Pierre on Manhattan?fs East Side to hear about recent developments in the treatment of breast cancer from speakers representing non-profit, surgical, pharmaceutical and financial perspectives...
READ MORE

White Coat Ceremony at Mount Sinai School
of Medicine

White Coat ceremonies are ?grites of passage?h for beginning medical students and are designed to reinforce the need for physicians to incorporate sensitivity and compassion as well as medical knowledge into their future endeavors...
READ MORE

New Comprehensive Gastrointestinal Health Center To Be Established At New York Presbyterian-Weill Cornell
The New York Presbyterian Hospital announced plans to establish the Jay Monahan Center for Gastrointestinal Health at the Hospital?fs Weill Cornell Medical Center site...
READ MORE

October 2002

Columbia Nursing Dean Hopes to
Transform Profession

by Merri Rosenberg
To hear Mary O’Neil Mundinger, Dean of the Columbia University School of Nursing and the Centennial Professor in Health Policy, explain it, the much discussed nursing shortage has less to do...
READ MORE

September 2002

Vaccines Required for School 
by Herman Rosen, M.D., F.A.C.P.
With the school year about to begin, it is useful to review the New York City Department of Health?fs requirements for school children...

READ MORE

Colleges Endorse Meningitis Vaccine
by Priya Athiappan
This Fall, thousands of college students will be vaccinated against meningococcal meningitis...
READ MORE

August 2002

Teachers, Students and Researchers Work
Side-by-Side at Rockefeller University

by Marie Holmes
Leslie Vosshall, Annenberg Assistant Professor at Rockefeller University, is delivering a lecture on the groundbreaking work done by researchers...
READ MORE

Weill Cornell Medical College Advance
Recovery of Adult Bone Marrow Stem Cells for Tissue Regeneration
Edited By Herman Rosen, M.D.
READ MORE

Take Steps to Protect Eyes From Harmful UV Rays
by Betsy van Die
Are you a sun worshipper who cannot wait to hit the beach once summer arrives?
READ MORE

The Bee's Knees: Common Childhood Knee Injuries and Their Treatment
by Dr. Fred Cushner
READ MORE

Cal State University, L.A.
School of Nursing Expands Baccalaureate Program

The School of Nursing at California State University, Los Angeles has received a pledge of $178,500 from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center for the education of two cohorts of 10...
READ MORE

July 2002

Talking with Pioneer Dr. Ira Black About
Parkinson's Disease

by Joan Baum
It's hard to believe that this internationally known clinical neurologist and neuroscientist, at the cutting edge of research, wasn't thinking of medicine when he was in college.
READ MORE

Choices: Perspectives of a Patient With
Parkinson's Disease

by Harvey K. Friedland, J.D., B.E.E.
It started with a twitch in one of my fingers. It pulsated then quickly abated. For reasons then beyond my comprehension, it started again.
READ MORE

Risky Teen Behavior
by Richard Frances, M.D.
Early detection and treatment of major psychiatric disorders that afflict young people, including addiction, depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety disorder, attention deficit disorder, and schizophrenia can be the best way to prevent the serious consequences of mental illness, including suicide.
READ MORE

Depression in Teenagers
by Glenn S. Hirsch, M.D.
Adolescence and the beginning of adulthood is a developmental phase burdened with stressful events: high school, starting college, pursuing career goals, forming relationships with friends and significant others, coping with changing family roles.
READ MORE

June 2002

Athletes and Drugs...The High Price of Success
by Dr. Richard Frances and Nancy Helle
The widespread use by athletes of performance enhancing drugs, many of which are sold over the counter, was discussed at the recent seminar on Addiction Psychiatry at Silver Hill Hospital in New Canaan, CT.

READ MORE

Rockefeller U. Fellow Aspires To Make a Difference in Society & Science
by Marylena Mantas
For Tshaka Cunningham, a graduate fellow at Rockefeller University and a recipient of the prestigious David Rockefeller fellowship, quality time with his grandmother transcended visits to the local playground.

READ MORE

Weill Cornell Medical College Advances Edited
by Herman Rosen, M.D.
Study of Cardiac Scarring That Leads to Heart Failure
READ MORE

May 2002

Playing with matches: Medical students learn
their fates
READ MORE

Beyond The Stethoscope
by DA Feinfeld
READ MORE

1.1 Million Books To Needy Children:
Dr. Perri Klass & Dr. Brian McDonough Celebrate

by Pola Rosen, Ed.D.
READ MORE

Patients Urged to "Speak Up" for Safety
Edited by Herman Rosen, M.D.
READ MORE

April 2002

Alpha Omega Alpha Robert J. Glaser Distinguished Teacher Awards, 2001
by Edward D. Harris, Jr., M.D.
READ MORE

Dr. Aram Chobanian: Dean, Boston U. School
of Medicine

by Joan Baum, Ph.D.
READ MORE

March 2002

Beyond The Stethoscope Poems
by D. A. Feinfeld, M.D.
READ MORE

Weill Cornell Medical College Advances
Newborns Learn to Distinguish Speech Sounds
While Asleep

Edited By Herman Rosen, M.D.
READ MORE

Harold Koplewicz, M.D.
Advocate & Champion of Child Mental Health

by Bruce Myint
One look at the warm lights and pastel colored interior of the New York University Child Study Center and all the images you have about mental-health facilities begin to fade away.
READ MORE

February 2002

Weill Cornell Medical College Advances
The Immune Deficiency Causing Type 1 Diabetes

Edited by Herman Rosen, M.D.
An article recently published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation by lead authors Drs. Noel Maclaren and Anjli Kukreja of the Department of Pediatrics at Weill Cornell Medical College investigates 60 patients with immune-mediated type 1 diabetes.
READ MORE

Interview with Dr. Herbert Pardes,
President, NY Presbyterian Hospital

by Joan Baum, Ph.D.
He seems to know everyone?|the operative words are ?gknow?h and ?geveryone?h?| ?gknow?h because Dr. Herbert Pardes has been a distinguished psychiatrist and department...
READ MORE

MD-PhD Training Program for Minority
Students Receives $500,000 Challenge Grant

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has pledged a $500,000 challenge grant over the next three years to help create a $1 million endowment for the Gateways to the Laboratory Program, a joint endeavor of the Tri-Institutional M.D.-Ph.D.
READ MORE

January 2002

Dean Ralph A. O'Connell: New York Medical College
by Joan Baum, Ph.D.
Though not as well known perhaps as some other medical schools in the New York City area, the School of Medicine at New York Medical College in Valhalla, in Westchester County, is hardly a well-kept secret.

READ MORE

Weill Cornell Medical College Advances Edited
by Herman Rosen, M.D.
READ MORE

December 2001

Sloan-Kettering Researcher Makes Difference in Lives of Three HS Students
by Marylena Mantas
Last winter Dr. Sat Bhattacharya, a research scientist at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, ventured into inner-city, public high schools searching for students who possessed a certain motivation and something that he calls ?gthe initial spark.
READ MORE

November 2001

Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons: Dean Gerald Fischbach
by Jacob M. Appel
If good marriages depend upon a combination of something old and something new, then the match between recently appointed Dean Gerald D. Fischbach and Columbia University?fs College of Physicians and Surgeons seems promising.
READ MORE

Rita Kaplan Fights For What She Believes In: Honored at NYU School of Medicine
by Pola Rosen, Ed.D.
It was a grand turn-out for "Tea with Our Doctors," an innovative approach to disseminating information about women's health, honoring an individual whose...
READ MORE

HealthWise Tips for Travelers
by Louise Merriman, MS, RD
In order to begin your trip feeling more energetic, try eliminating or at least limiting alcohol and caffeine-containing beverages for two or three days before your flight.
READ MORE

October 2001

Lung Transplant Survivor Writes Patient Guide
Karen Couture, diagnosed with a rare lung disease called lymphangioleiomyomatosis at the age of 32, was the recipient of a double-lung transplant in 1996.
READ MORE

Advertising Campaign Seeks to Recruit Future Nurses
Nurses for a Healthier Tomorrow, a coalition of 32 leading nursing and health care organizations addressing the nursing shortage, is launching a national advertising campaign to recruit young people into the nursing profession and encourage existing nurses to remain.
READ MORE

Dean Robert Glickman:
NYU School of Medicine Continuing a Family Tradition

by Jacob M. Appel
Medicine is under attack these days, says Dr. Robert Glickman, the Dean of the New York University School of Medicine.
READ MORE

Verifying Physicians' Credentials
Medversant Technologies has released a powerful (on line) credentials verification tool for the health care industry. WebCVO 3.0 lets a practitioner create a single, centralized credentials verification application that may be accessed by multiple users, including health plans, hospitals and medical groups, for verification of credentials information.
READ MORE

Are You Getting Enough Sleep?
Most people need eight hours of sleep each night, say the experts. Until you get enough sleep, you won?ft function as efficiently, your health will be at risk and even your job may be in jeopardy.
READ MORE

September 2001

Surgeon Titles: Dr. vs. Mr.
by Mr. Rodney Croft
Special to Education Update
While surgeons carry the appellation ?gDr.?h in the USA and other parts of the world, in the UK they are referred to as ?gMr.?h How has this anomaly arisen?
READ MORE

The Noblest Roman of Them All: Dean Stanford Roman
by Jacob M. Appel
An old joke tells aspiring high school students how to gain admission to medical school: have parents with high SAT scores. If a great number of the physicians in New York City are the children and grandchildren of physicians-including, incidentally,...
READ MORE

Shy People Are Not Born That Way, According
To IU Researcher

People are not born shy, according to Bernardo Carducci, a professor of psychology at Indiana University Southeast. In a recent paper, Carducci, director of IU Southeast's Shyness Research Institute, argues that people are not born shy.
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Smith Abbot Law Firm Brings Broad Experience and Dedication To The Seriously Injured
Smith Abbot, L.L.P. of New York City, has built a national reputation in complex toxic tort and product liability lawsuits with trial experience in courts across the country.
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Researcher Awarded $450,000 For Study
Jay Edelberg, M.D., Ph.D., a cardiovascular researcher and Assistant Professor of Medicine at Weill Medical College of Cornell University, has been named a 2001-2004 Paul Beeson Physician Faculty Scholar by the American Federation for Aging Research (AFAR) and the Alliance for Aging Research.
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Laparoscopic Surgery The Technique
Video technology has entered the operating room in the form of laparoscopic surgery, a technique used to treat many abdominal conditions.
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August 2001

Promoting Lifelong Physical Activity
The Center for Disease Control (CDC) has compiled Guidelines for School and Community Programs to Promote Lifelong Physical Activity Among Young People.
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Study Probes Cancer in Minorities
The American Cancer Society reported that African-Americans are more likely to develop cancer than all other racial and ethnic groups.

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Dean Dominick Purpura:
Breaking Down Barriers at Albert Einstein

by Joan Baum, PH.D.
An almost life-size sculpture of Albert Einstein, with his hands folded and legs crossed, looks over Dr. Dominick P. Purpura, Dean of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University (AECOM), when he is in his office.
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Overweight Children and Diabetes
Type 2 diabetes (non-insulin dependent) has been most commonly associated with adults. However, the phenomenon increasingly affects overweight children.
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Women: Heart Disease Facts READ MORE

Choosing a Quality Hospital READ MORE

Lung Cancer Patients Sought for Study READ MORE

Soy Protein Wins FDA Approval READ MORE

Getting the Facts on STDs READ MORE

July 2001

Downstate's Dean Eugene Feigelson:
Professionalism in a New Curriculum

by Joan Baum, Ph.D.
As the Dean of the College of Medicine, one of the five major divisions of The State University of New York Health Science Center at Brooklyn, known simply as Downstate, Dr. Eugene B. Feigelson holds an understandably responsible position: Downstate is the borough?fs only academic medical center.
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The Healing Power of Laughter
by Tom Kertes
Helping sick children feel better is no joke. But for the over 300 third-grade kids at Manhattan's PS 128, learning that they can help others feel better through humor has been serious business.
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Mt. Sinai Graduates' High School Students
by Joan Baum, Ph.D.
This is unique, there's nothing else like it, beamed Dr. Nathan Kase, Dean Emeritus of the Mount Sinai School of Medicine (MSSM), captivated by the graduation of the latest group of youngsters from the Secondary Education Through Health (SETH) program and the Bioscience Studies Institute.
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Two Problems, One Innovative Solution
by Dr. Richard Frances and Nancy Helle
Bipolar disorders affect more than 5 million Americans and about 60 percent of the patients with these psychiatric problems or mood disorders also have alcohol or drug problems.
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Know Your Diabetes Facts
Diabetes has no cure but can be controlled. It is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, affecting people of all ages and ethnic groups.
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Remember that Children Need Calcium
Children and teens need calcium for bone growth, yet many are not getting enough, according to the International Food Information Council.
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June 2001

Buying Prescription Drugs Online? Caveat Emptor
With hundreds of drug-dispensing websites in business, how can consumers tell which sites are legitimate? The FDA warns of the dangers of purchasing medical products online.
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Pain Killers, Addiction & Pain Management
by Dr. Richard Frances and Nancy Helle
While only about two to three percent of the 34 million people who have chronic pain develop a major addictive problem from pain medication, there are many more who are addicts; several million who abuse painkillers when they can get them for any reason.
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Interview: Dean Arthur Rubenstein,
Mt. Sinai School of Medicine
A Curricular Face-Lift at Mount Sinai

by Jacob M. Appel
For years the faculty at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine thought of their 33-year old institution as young, at least in relation to the 149-year old Mount Sinai Hospital. Arthur H. Rubinstein felt otherwise.
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May 2001

Innovator: Cornell's Medical Dean, Antonio Gotto
by Jacob M. Appel
Much humor has developed surrounding the relationship between physicians and attorneys. From the medical man's point of view, doctors heal the poor and the sick, while lawyers sue them.
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Ask The Eye Care Specialist READ MORE

Relief for Teaching Hospitals
Congress has enacted the Benefits Improvement and Protection Act of 2000 (BIPA) which will lessen the burdens imposed on teaching hospitals by the balanced Budget Act of 1997 (BBA) during the next five years.
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Music Therapy for People with Alzheimer's or Parkinson's Disease
Music may benefit the four million Americans suffering from Alzheimer's and could potentially help many of the one million Americans with Parkinson's disease, according to several studies that have looked at music therapy's effect on memory and other mental activities.

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April 2001

NYU Medical Students Open Their Envelopes
Students at NYU School of Medicine had their share of Oscar week drama at 12 Noon on March 22, when graduates learned where they would serve their residencies. Relief at Alumni Hall followed anxiety as 155 students simultaneously opened their envelopes to find out where they were matched.
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Preparing For the Summer
by Warren M. Seigel, M.D., F.A.A.P.
Spring is here and summer is coming. After a long winter indoors, parents often start to ask that age-old question: What am I going to do with the kids this summer?? A little advance planning can go a long way towards guaranteeing a fun and safe summer for all.
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Bills Offer Relief from Medical School Debt
by Tanya Albert
Med school graduates drowning in student loan debt could see a bigger income tax return if legislation proposed in the House and Senate is successful.
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TV's Becker Learns Bedside Manners at
NYU Medical School

by Sybil Maimin
Ted Danson, the star of Becker, the Monday night television sitcom about a brash, tough-talking doctor, went to school at Bellevue Hospital last week.
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